The end of all war?

1918, the last year of the Great War is a distant event in a textbook for us. In the Dead the Night (releasing 3/9) focuses on the last year of what many believed was the end of all war.

Hindsight is truly 20/20.

But although history disappoints us, and war remains an ever-present reality, so does hope. The reality that each day spells a new beginning is something that we must always cherish, as well as the steps we take toward a positive, larger goal. Many times the sunlight of our future victories is hidden behind the thunderheads of seeming defeat. But appearance can be deceiving.

For example, on March 3, 1918 a treaty was signed between Soviet Russia and the Central Powers which allowed 50 divisions of German troops to launch a crushing offensive against the Allies. With each division containing a max of 25,000 men, it’s easy to imagine the horror that must have filled the hearts of the British soldiers and their Allies. The Historic UK website records that the Germans soon put those men to good use and launched a new offensive.

But difficult struggles don’t always occur over patches of earth. Perhaps the struggle in your case is emotional or a battle for your health (physical or mental). Maybe it’s the fight to keep a roof over your head, kids in school, and food on the table.

I know. I’ve been there. Whatever the situation, remember that the struggle isn’t over because your situation seems more difficult than it did yesterday. Tomorrow can still bring hope, help, and freedom.

For the Allies, that help came when American forces were victorious at the Battle of Cantigny in May. A ray of sunlight broke through that could propel the wearied Allies just a little further.

In your case, look for the bright spots—those isolated moments of victory that give you the strength to pick up once more. When the road get rough, remember that encouraging scripture, the text or phone call that just means so much.

There’s this quote in In the Dead of the Night that really spoke to me when I first drafted the manuscript. Against all odds, Thomas Steele is clinging stubbornly to his belief that his son, Malcolm, and his daughter-in-law Leila (who’s an ex-German spy) will be able to overcome the stain of treason and live freely in England someday.

In the eyes of everyone it’s impossible but Thomas says,

 …if I bothered to consider impossibilities, I could never be who I am. Everything about my faith defies our understanding of what is possible.

A virgin giving birth? A crucified Man killing death itself? Impossible. Yet true. True enough to change the hearts of men. True enough to revolutionize the world.

Thomas Steele, In the Dead of the Night

Regardless of how impossible the situation—don’t give up hope! Tomorrow can always be better than today.

We know how the war ended. Ultimately, the Allies were victorious and the storm clouds of war broke beneath the power of light…if only for a time. But the truth is, no matter how many times the clouds gather in your life, the light that broke through the first time is still more than powerful to do it once again.

Look up. For miracles happen to those who believe.

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JP Robinson
JP Robinson

JP Robinson is the President of Lancaster Christian Writers Association, minister, and educator. He has over 15 years experience in education and marketing. JP’s novels have garnered praise by industry leaders such as Publisher’s Weekly.

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